• Adam Anderson

The Vaccine is Working


COVID19 VACCINE
CREDIT: John Cameron, Unsplash

COVID is changing. In a bad way…


With the South African strain attacking the UK, and the ever-adjusting nature of the virus, it’s spreading through the population at an alarming rate – a hideous bug that’s more contagious than ever.


Thankfully, as I’m sure you’re aware, there’s restrictions to stomp it out. But is it enough?


Who bloody knows…


To highlight the severity of infection rates, we’ll use nursing homes as an example. Being a healthcare recruitment agent, this comes from my own experience.


A resident - some poor old sod – will contract the virus, whereupon the entire home needs to be tested. Before you know it, the care home manager informs the workers (and the temporary agency staff) that the tests have come back. To people’s horror, there’s thirty or forty new cases in the home, and every resident needs to go into isolation.


A grim picture, but unfortunately true.


Yet, there’s an odd twist to these new – all too common – scenarios.


What’s odd about it?’ I ask the care home manager.


There’s a pause on the phone. ‘Well, I don’t know if you’ll believe me, but… Every single resident shows no symptoms.’


‘None of them?’


‘None whatsoever.’


Of course, this isn’t always the case. There’s also care homes riddled with corona, like the imaginary example above, where the symptoms are present. I don’t really want to talk about that though…


The virus has killed 1 in every 1000 people in the UK. Same as the USA.


Whilst at first this might not sound much, it does mean - if we use that rule – that this thing has killed over 350,000 Americans.


Pay attention to that word.


Over.


Meaning the figure is actually far greater. Last I heard, it was around 400,000.


Which, let’s be honest, is fucking scary.


However, this trend of asymptomatic residents does suggest something. Something rather positive, actually.


The vaccine is working.


With (at the time of writing this) over 11 million doses administered, almost every resident across the country has been given one – with the care home/hospital staff next in line.


Now you might be thinking, ‘but they’re still testing positive, so how is it working?’


Well, to answer your doubts, the vaccine doesn’t magically stop the virus from entering your body. It just means that your body can fight it off effectively. So, if you time it badly, and you’re tested for COVID-19 whilst it’s still in you, YOU WILL STILL SHOW AS POSITIVE.


Make sense?


If it doesn’t, well… I don’t know what to tell you…


Just trust me, I guess?


My point is, the correlation between vaccinations and less deaths is not just a coincidence. This goes for all diseases, not just COVID-19.


As another example, I’ll tear out a snippet from a BBC article about smallpox - (published 07/02/2021):


“On the website of the Science Museum you can see a framed reproduction of some data about smallpox cases, published in the Times in July 1923.


"Convincing Facts!" it reads. "Those who disbelieve in vaccination should ponder the following figures issued by the health committee of Gloucester."



(Poster about smallpox vaccine)

IMAGE COPYRIGHTWELLCOME COLLECTION


You can read the full article here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55952189


To sum things up – the above image shows the number of admissions to a hospital in 1923 suffering from smallpox. 350 people.


Out of those, 319 of them were not vaccinated.


18 of them had their vaccine so long ago that it had left their system.


And, finally, 13 of those were vaccinated, but they contracted the disease either just before or directly after their shot – meaning the vaccine didn’t have time to work its magic.


Every case was due to not having the vaccine (or, not having it in time etc.)


Linking back to the COVID vaccine, we’re seeing results even with people who’ve only had their first dose.


Now, I’m not a scientist, or some brainiac in a lab.


But I am in healthcare.


If you’re offered the vaccine, FUCKING TAKE IT.

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